2008 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show - Nanotech 2008 - 11th Annual
Technical Conferences
Merck Corporate Needs
NanoInk Symposium
Nano Electronics & Photonics
Nano Fabrication
MEMS & NEMS
Sensors & Systems
Micro & Nano Fluidics
MSM - Modeling Microsystems
WCM - Compact Modeling
Nanostructured Materials & Devices
Soft Nanotechnologies & Applications
Nanoparticles in Soft Materials - Colloidal Systems
Polymer Nanotechnology
Carbon Nano Structures & Devices
Nano Particles & Applications
Composites
Nanostructured Surfaces and Interfaces
Nanoscale Characterization
Energy Technologies & Applications
Nanotech in Health, Environment & Society
ICCN - Nanoscale Modeling
Nanoreliability
Bio Nano Materials & Tissues
Bio Sensors & Diagnostics
Biomarkers & Nanoparticles
Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment
Drug Delivery & Therapeutics
Nano Medicine
Nanotech to Neurology
Phage Nanobiotechnology
Clean Technology 2008
Industrial Impact Workshop
Confirmed Speakers
Program Committee
Reviewers

Partnering Events:

TechConnect Summit
Clean Technology 2008

Phage Nanobiotechnology

Imaging

Symposium Sessions

 

Monday June 2

 

Tuesday June 3

 

Wednesday June 4

10:30 Phage Nanobiotechnology
1:30 Phage Nanobiotechnology
4:00 Phage Nanobiotechnology
 

Thursday June 5

 

Symposium Program

 

Wednesday June 4

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10:30 Phage NanobiotechnologyRoom 209
 Session chair: Valery Petrenko, Auburn University
10:30 Evolution of Phage Display Towards Nanobiotechnology
V. Petrenko, Auburn University, US
10:50 Structure of Filamentous Phage Particles and Their Components
S.J. Opella, University of California, San Diego, US
11:10 Phage Nanoparticles: Replication and Assembly
G.P. Smith, University of Missouri, US
11:30 Phage-Based Patient-Specific Navigation Systems
S.L. Deutscher, University of Missouri, US
11:50 Imaging with Phage Probes
K.A. Kelly, Harvard Medical School/MGH, US
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1:30 Phage NanobiotechnologyRoom 209
 Session chair: Angela M. Belcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US
1:30 Phage-derived Vehicles for Gene and Drug Delivery
V. Petrenko, Auburn University, US
1:50 Phage-Templated Synthesis of Inorganic Nanomaterials
A.M. Belcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US
2:10 Site-Directed Chemical Modification of Phage Particles
C.J. Noren, New England Biolabs, US
2:30 Phage-based Biorecognition Interfaces in Biosensors
B.A. Chin, Auburn University, US
2:50 Human tumor-specific phage nanoparticles
D. Krag, The University of Vermont, US
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4:00 Phage NanobiotechnologyRoom 209
 Session chair: Valery Petrenko, Auburn University
4:00 Combinatorial Phage Nanobiotechnology
L. Makowski, Argonne National Laboratory, US
4:20 Targeting Nanoparticle Probes to Differentiating Stem Cells
J. Cabral-Teixeira, K. Benjamin, L. Zhang, J. Maurer, M. Tsuda, Y.S. Chao, N. Prigozhina, J. Price, E. Snyder, M. Mercola, E. Ruoslahti, M.D. West, D. Larocca, Advanced Cell Technology, US
4:40 Phage Probes for Cancer Diagnostic and Treatment
T.I. Samoylova, N.E. Morrison, N.R. Cox, Auburn University, US
5:00 Pharmacokinetic Optimization of Phage Particles for Gene-Delivery
A. Baird, D. Larocca, University of California San Diego Medical Center, US
5:20 Targeted Drug-carrying Filamentous Phage Nanomedicines
I. Yacoby, H. Bar, L. Vax, I. Benhar, Tel Aviv University, IL
 

Symposium Chairs

Valery Petrenko Valery A. Petrenko
Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine
Auburn University, Alabama
Angela Belcher Angela M. Belcher
Germehausen Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Confirmed Invited Speakers

Stanley Opella Structure of Filamentous Phage Particles and Their Components
Stanley J. Opella
Professor
University of California, San Diego
Susan L. Deutscher Phage-Based Patient-Specific Navigation Systems
Susan L. Deutscher
Associate Professor of Biochemistry
University of Missouri
Valery Petrenko Phage-derived Vehicles for Gene and Drug Delivery
Valery A. Petrenko
Auburn University, Alabama
Bryan A. Chin Phage-based Biorecognition Interfaces in Biosensors
Bryan A. Chin
Professor and Chair, Materials Research & Education Ctr., Auburn University, Alabama
David Krag Human tumor-specific phage nanoparticles
David Krag
S.D. Ireland Professor of Surgery
The University of Vermont
Itai Benhar Targeted Drug-carrying Filamentous Phage Nanomedicines
Itai Benhar
Associate Professor
Tel-Aviv University, Israel
George P. Smith Phage Nanoparticles: Replication and Assembly
George P. Smith
Professor, Division of Biological Sciences, Tucker Hall, University of Missouri
Kimberly Kelly Imaging Phage Probes
Kimberly A. Kelly
Assistant Professor
Harvard University, Massachusetts General Hospital
Angela Belcher Phage-Templated Synthesis of Inorganic Nanomaterials
Angela M. Belcher
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Christopher Noren Site-Directed Chemical Modification of Phage Particles
Christopher J. Noren, Head, Bioorganic Chemistry Division, New England Biolabs
Lee Makowski Combinatorial Phage Nanobiotechnology
Lee Makowski
Senior Scientist, Biosciences Division
Argonne National Laboratory
Andrew Baird Pharmacokinetic Optimization of Phage Particles for Gene-Delivery
Andrew Baird
Professor
University of California at San Diego

Special Symposium

A new promising type of nanomaterials—bacteriophages—emerged recently as a result of evolution of phage display technique.  In opposite to other nanomaterials, the bacteriophages have the unique feature—their structure and function are encrypted in their genomic DNA, which can be intentionally modified or even rewritten using routine genetic engineering techniques. Phage as a new kind of nanomaterials attracts attention of specialists working in boundary, and even very distal areas from genetics and molecular biology, such as pharmaceutical science, material science, microelectronics, biosensors, detection, environmental sciences, etc. Penetration of the phage technology into these new disciplines requires development of new concepts, which will be the focus of the symposium. The symposium will introduce new researchers into this hot new area of phage nanobiotechnology, summarize the existing data on the phage nanomaterials and discuss a prospect of their use in different areas of medicine, science and technology.

Topics & Application Areas

Online abstract submissions are now being accepted. Proposed topics include, but are not be limited to:

  • Amplification and Self Assemblage of Phage Particles
  • Engineering of phage shape and function
  • Imaging Phage Probes
  • Phage-Based Biorecognition Interfaces in Biosensors
  • Phage-Based Patient-Specific Navigation Systems
  • Phage-Derived Interfaces between Organic and Inorganic Materials
  • Phage-derived Vehicles for Gene and Drug Delivery
  • Phage-Driven Synthesis of Inorganic Nanomaterials
  • Site-Directed Chemical Modification of Phage Particles
  • Structure of Filamentous Phage Particles and Their Components
  • Distinct Viral Nanomaterials
  • Other

Journal Submissions

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine)

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine)

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine) is a newly established, international, peer-reviewed journal published quarterly. Nanomedicine publishes basic, clinical, and engineering research in the innovative field of nanomedicine. Article categories include basic nanomedicine, diagnostic nanomedicine, experimental nanomedicine, clinical nanomedicine, and engineering nanomedicine, pharmacological nanomedicine.

For consideration into the Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine journal please select the “Submit to Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine” button during the on-line submission procedure. You may only select a single journal during the submission process.