2007 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show - Nanotech 2007 - 10th Annual
Technical Conferences
Nano Electronics & Photonics
Nano Fabrication
MEMS & NEMS
Sensors & Systems
Micro & Nano Fluidics
MSM - Modeling Microsystems
WCM - Compact Modeling
Nanostructured Materials & Devices
Soft Nanotechnologies & Applications
Nanoparticles in Soft Materials - Colloidal Systems
Polymer Nanotechnology
Carbon Nano Structures & Devices
Nano Particles & Applications
Composites & Interfaces
Energy Technologies & Applications
Nanotech in Health, Environment & Society
ICCN - Nanoscale Modeling
Nanoscale Characterization
Homeland Security
Bio Nano Materials & Tissues
Bio Sensors & Diagnostics
Biomarkers & Nanoparticles
Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment
Drug Delivery & Therapeutics
Nano Medicine
Nanotech to Neurology
TechConnect Summit - IP Matchmaking
Cleantech 2007
Industrial Impact Workshop
Program Committee

2007 Symposium on

Nanotechnology for Cancer Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment

CancerNano 2007

Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment

May 20 - 24, 2007
Santa Clara Convention Center
Silicon Valley, U.S.A

Symposium sponsors

National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health

Symposium Chairs

Mansoor Amiji Mansoor Amiji
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences,
Northeastern University
Vladimir Torchilin Vladimir Torchilin
Bouvé College of Health Sciences,
Northeastern University

Symposium Keynotes

Anna D. Barker The Promise of Nanotechnology in Cancer
Anna D. Barker
Deputy Director
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Nicholas van Bruggen Advancing Drug Discovery and Development with Molecular Imaging
Nicholas van Bruggen
Associate Director: Biomedical Imaging
Genentech

Confirmed Speakers

Roger Y. Tsien Development of Nanotools for Cancer Detection and Imaging
Roger Y. Tsien
University of California, San Diego
Michael J. Sailor Silicon-based “Mother Ships” for nano-diagnostics and nano-therapeutics
Michael J. Sailor
University of California, San Diego
David Cheresh Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging and Therapy
David Cheresh
University of California, San Diego
Hayat Onyuksel Targeted Nanoparticles in Cancer Therapy
Hayat Onyuksel
University of Illinois at Chicago
James R. Heath Early Cancer Detection with Nanodevices
James R. Heath
National Cancer Institutes NSB Cancer Center, Caltech, UCLA
Sanjiv Sam Gambhir Molecular Imaging in Cancer
Sanjiv Sam Gambhir
Director, Molecular Imaging Program, Head, Nuclear Medicine Stanford University
Francis C. Szoka Novel Bioresponsive Nanocarriers for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery
Francis C. Szoka
Director, Molecular Imaging Program, Head, Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University
Vladimir Torchilin “Smart Nanosystems” — Opportunity for Multi-functionalization in Tumor Targeting and Delivery
Vladimir Torchilin
Northeastern University

Panel: Breaking Barriers – Clinical Translation of Cancer Nanotechnology

Mostafa Analoui Large Pharmaceutical Industry Perspective
Mostafa Analoui
Pfizer Global Research and Development
Linda K. Molnar NCI Nanotechnology for Cancer Alliance Perspective
Linda K. Molnar
Nanotechnology Alliance, National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Dennis Goupil Small Pharmaceutical/Medical Device Industry Perspective
Dennis Goupil
Biocure, Inc.
Nakissa Sadrieh Food and Drug Administration Perspective
Nakissa Sadrieh
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Symposium Sessions

 

Monday May 21

7:00 Registration
8:30 Nanotech Conference Opening & Keynotes
10:30 BioSensors: Diagnostics & Assays 1
1:30 BioSensors: Diagnostics & Assays 2
4:00 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment
 

Tuesday May 22

7:00 TUESDAY - Registration
8:30 Keynotes: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment
10:30 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment
1:30 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment
4:00 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment
4:00 Poster Session 1 (4:00 - 6:00) & Expo Reception
 

Wednesday May 23

8:30 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment: Panel
10:30 BioNano: Drug Delivery
2:00 Nanotech Poster Session 2 - Expo Reception (2:00 - 4:00)
5:00 Merck Special Reception: Novel Delivery Technology Needs
 

Thursday May 24

 

Symposium Program

 

Monday May 21

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7:00 RegistrationMain Lobby
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8:30 Nanotech Conference Opening & KeynotesGrand Ballroom
 Session chair: Bart Romanowicz, NSTI, Andreas Wild, Freescale Semiconductors
8:30 How the US Can Ensure Energy Supply for the Future
J. Hofmeister, Shell Oil, US (bio)
9:10 National Nanotech Initiative and Industrial Nanotechnology Impact
A.H. Carim, Co-Chair, Nanoscale Science and Engineering Technology, Subcommittee, National Science & Technology Council, U.S. Department of Energy, US (bio)
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10:30 BioSensors: Diagnostics & Assays 1Great America 2
 Session chair: Srinivas Iyer, LANL
10:30 In-Plane Transduction of Nanomechanical Microcantilever Motion To Enable Sensor Arrays
G.P. Nordin, S. Kim, J. Noh and Y. Qian, Brigham Young University, US
10:50 Selective Heating Characterization of Nanoplate Devices for Simultaneous Sensing of Multiple Biomolecule Species at Ultra-low Concentrations
O.H. Elibol, B. Reddy_Jr. and R. Bashir, Purdue University, US
11:10 High-sensitive Label-free Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors Modified with Aptamers
K. Maehashi, T. Katsura, K. Matsumoto, K. Kerman, Y. Takamura and E. Tamiya, Osaka University, JP
11:30 Nanobiopore: A Novel Nano-Porous Electrode System to Enhance Biosensor Sensitivity
U. Müller, W. Nisch, S. Neugebauer, W. Schuhmann, S. Linke, M. Kaczor, T. Lohmüller, J. Spatz, M. Motz, J. Sorsa, S. Hecke, G. Hartwich and M. Stelzle, NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute, DE
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1:30 BioSensors: Diagnostics & Assays 2Grand Ballroom D
 Session chair: Srinivas Iyer, LANL
1:30 Investigation of pH behavior of single myocyte cells in picoliter microfluidic device
I.A. Ges and F.J. Baudenbacher, Vanderbilt University, US
1:50 Microfluidic electromanipulation with capacitive detection for cell diagnostic applications
G.A. Ferrier, A.N. Hladio, D.J. Thomson, G.E. Bridges, M. Hedayatipoor, S. Olson and M. Freeman, University of Manitoba, CA
2:30 Devices for Nanoparticle-based Cancer Detection
G.Y. Kim, K.D. Daniel, C.C. Vassiliou, N. Elman, L. Josephson and M.J. Cima, MIT, US
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4:00 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & TreatmentGreat America 3
 Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
4:00 Development of Nanoconjugate with Different Monoclonal Antibodies to Inhibit Molecular Targets Important for Tumor Angiogenesis
M. Fujita, N.M. Khazenzon, B.S. Lee, E. Holler, K.L. Black and J.Y. Ljubimova, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, US
4:20 Multivalent magnetic nanoparticles for T cell-specific tracking via magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging for cancer treatment reporting
J. Gunn, O. Veiseh, C. Sun, C. Fang, H. Wallen, J. Cao, C. Yee and M. Zhang, University of Washington, US
4:40 Characterization and in vivo efficacy of targeted nanoparticles for systemic siRNA delivery to tumors
D.W. Bartlett and M.E. Davis, California Institute of Technology, US
5:00 Development of a specific micro/nanodevice validating the concept of molecular biopsy
F. Berger, A. Bouamrani, M. Cosnier, F. Martin, P. Caillat and A.L. Benabid, Inserm, FR
5:20 Sirna Nanomedicines for Cancer Gene Therapy
S.H. Kim and T.G. Park, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, KR
 

Tuesday May 22

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7:00 TUESDAY - RegistrationMain Lobby
Back to Top
8:30 Keynotes: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & TreatmentTheater
 Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
8:30 The Promise of Nanotechnology in Cancer
A. Barker, National Cancer Institute, US (bio)
9:15 Advancing Drug Discovery and Development with Molecular Imaging
N. Van Bruggen, Genentech, US (bio)
Back to Top
10:30 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & TreatmentTheater
 Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
10:30 Development of Nanotools for Cancer Detection and Imaging
R.Y. Tsien, University of California San Diego, US (bio)
11:00 Early Cancer Detection with Nanodevices
J. Heath, California Institute of Technology, US (bio)
11:30 Molecular Imaging in Cancer
S.S. Gambhir, Stanford University, US (bio)
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1:30 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & TreatmentTheater
 Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
1:30 Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging and Therapy
D. Cheresh, University of California San Diego, US (bio)
2:00 Silicon-based ''Mother Ships'' for nano-diagnostics and nano-therapeutics
M. Sailor, University of California San Diego, US (bio)
Back to Top
4:00 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & TreatmentTheater
 Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
4:00 Targeted Nanoparticles in Cancer Therapy
H. Onyuksel, University of Illinois at Chicago, US (bio)
4:30 “Smart Nanosystems” – Opportunity for Multi-functionalization in Tumor Targeting and Delivery
V. Torchilin, North Eastern University, US (bio)
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4:00 Poster Session 1 (4:00 - 6:00) & Expo ReceptionExhibit Hall
 

Wednesday May 23

Back to Top
8:30 BioNano: Cancer Diagnostics, Imaging & Treatment: PanelGrand Ballroom E
 Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
- Large Pharmaceutical Industry PerspectiveM. Analoui, Pfizer Global Research, US (bio)
- NCI Nanotechnology for Cancer Alliance PerspectiveL.K. Molnar, Nanotechnology Alliance, National Cancer Institute (NCI), US (bio)
- Small Pharmaceutical/Medical Device Industry PerspectiveT. Hirt, Biocure, Inc., US
- Food and Drug Administration PerspectiveN. Sadrieh, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), US (bio)
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10:30 BioNano: Drug DeliveryGrand Ballroom D
 Session chair: Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern University, US
10:30 Targeted Nanoparticle-Polypeptide Conjugates for Breast Cancer Treatment
F. Alexis, P. Basto, A. Radovic-Moreno, R. Langer and O.C. Farokhzad, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, US
10:50 Polymer Nanospheres for Improved Drug Delivery of Protein Therapeutics and Viral Antigens
T.P. Castor, Aphios Corporation, US
11:10 Targeted Aptamer-Nanoparticles to Diminish Drug Resistance of Cancer Cells in vitro Study
P. Basto, F. Alexis, E. Levy-Nissenbaum, R. Langer and O. Farokzhad, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US
11:30 Drug Eluting Nanostructured Coatings
K.C. Popat, M. Eltgroth and T.A. Desai, University of California, San Francisco, US
11:50 Specific targeting and delivery of virus envelope-coated nanoparticle cargoes into receptor-bearing cells and subcellular compartments.
A.C. Moore, A.A. Kolokoltsov and R.A. Davey, University of Texas Medical Branch, US
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2:00 Nanotech Poster Session 2 - Expo Reception (2:00 - 4:00)Exhibit Hall
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5:00 Merck Special Reception: Novel Delivery Technology NeedsGreat America J
 Session chair: Stan Barnett, Merck, US
5:00 Merck's areas of interest for siRNA-related technologies
S. Bartnett, Merck, US
 

Welcome

NSTI is proud to collaborate with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in presenting a Special Symposium on Nanotechnology for Cancer Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment.

Towards the end of eliminating suffering and death from cancer, the National Cancer Institute is engaged in efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, image and treat cancer. The NCI-NSTI Nanotechnology for Cancer Special Symposium will run in parallel with the Nanotech 2007 and the BioNano 2007 providing a unique multidisciplinary environment directed towards addressing the challenges of cancer research and treatment.

Video Journey Into Nanotechnology

Watch Video Journey Into Nanotechnology (provided courtesy of NCI)

Synopsis

Nanotechnology has the potential to have a revolutionary impact on cancer diagnosis and therapy. It is universally accepted that early detection of cancer is essential even before anatomic anomalies are visible. A major challenge in cancer diagnosis in the 21st century is to be able to determine the exact relationship between cancer biomarkers and the clinical pathology, as well as, to be able to non-invasively detect tumors at an early stage for maximum therapeutic benefit. For breast cancer, for instance, the goal of molecular imaging is to be able to accurately diagnose when the tumor mass has approximately 100-1000 cells, as opposed to the current techniques like mammography, which require more than a million cells for accurate clinical diagnosis.

In cancer therapy, targeting and localized delivery are the key challenges. To wage an effective war against cancer, we have to have the ability to selectively attack the cancer cells, while saving the normal tissue from excessive burdens of drug toxicity. However, because many anticancer drugs are designed to simply kill cancer cells, often in a semi-specific fashion, the distribution of anticancer drugs in healthy organs or tissues is especially undesirable due to the potential for severe side effects. Consequently, systemic application of these drugs often causes severe side effects in other tissues (e.g. bone marrow suppression, cardiomyopathy, neurotoxicity), which greatly limits the maximal allowable dose of the drug. In addition, rapid elimination and widespread distribution into non-targeted organs and tissues requires the administration of a drug in large quantities, which is often not economical and sometimes complicated due to non-specific toxicity. This vicious cycle of large doses and the concurrent toxicity is a major limitation of current cancer therapy. In many instances, it has been observed that the patient succumbs to the ill effects of the drug toxicity far earlier than the tumor burden.

This symposium will address the potential ways in which nanotechnology can address these challenges. Distinguished speakers will summarize the current state of the art and future barriers. Contributions are also solicited in the following topics.

Topics and Applications

  • Science and technologies for cancer diagnostic and imaging techniques using nanoparticles as reporter platforms and contrast enhancing agents;
  • Bionalaytical nanotechnology for detection of biomarkers
  • Nanoparticle platforms polymeric nanoparticles, lipid nanoparticles, metal nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, and self-assembling nanosystems;
  • Synthetic chemistry required to design and optimize new strategies for nanoparticle preparation and functionalization;
  • Therapeutic targeted and intra-cellular drug and gene delivery using nanocarriers;
  • Nanoparticles for delivery of electromagnetic energy for hyperthermia and thermal ablation of tumors;
  • Theoretical modeling of nanoparticle processes in biological and medical environments, and of drug and gene delivery;
  • Combination therapies (drug and energy delivery) using nanoparticles
  • Clinical diagnosis and therapy of prostate, breast, and liver cancer.

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Journal Submissions

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine)

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine)

Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine (Nanomedicine) is a newly established, international, peer-reviewed journal published quarterly. Nanomedicine publishes basic, clinical, and engineering research in the innovative field of nanomedicine. Article categories include basic nanomedicine, diagnostic nanomedicine, experimental nanomedicine, clinical nanomedicine, and engineering nanomedicine, pharmacological nanomedicine.

For consideration into the Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine journal please select the “Submit to Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine” button during the on-line submission procedure. You may only select a single journal during the submission process.

Journal of Nanoparticle Research

Journal of Nanoparticle Research

Selected Nanotech Proceedings papers will be reviewed and invited into a Special Issue of Journal of Nanoparticle Research. The journal disseminates knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological phenomena and processes in nanoscale structures.

For consideration into this Special Issue of Journal of Nanoparticle Research, please select the “Submit to Journal of Nanoparticle Research” button during the on-line submission procedure. You may only select a single journal during the submission process.

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Conference Quick Links

 
 

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